A study evaluates suitability of anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer and VTE

 

A venous thromboembolic disease (VTE), shaped like a deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, is the second preventable death cause in patients with cancer. Cancer cells produce a series of substances that activate blood coagulation, they somehow thicken it, and that contributes blood to thrombose.

In fact, 1 out of 10-20 people with cancer develop a thrombosis or an embolism during cancer, so it is essential to know the best way of treating these patients.

A study carried out by the investigators of the RIETE group has analysed the risks and benefits of anticoagulant therapy in cancer patients with VTE, which always looks for a balance between density and fluency of blood in order to avoid new thrombotic episodes or major bleedings.

A study carried out by the investigators of the RIETE group has analysed the risks and benefits of anticoagulant therapy in cancer patients with VTE, which always looks for a balance between density and fluency of blood in order to avoid new thrombotic episodes or major bleedings.

Specialists analysed 10.962 patients with cancer and VTE. 5.740 patients had developed a pulmonary embolism and 5.222 had a venous thrombosis in one of the limbs. From all patients, 2,18% died due to pulmonary embolism and 1,55% died due to bleeding.

Data have confirmed that in those patients who were admitted due to pulmonary embolism, this was the main preventable death cause, after infection, bleeding or respiratory failure.

Authors of the article, recently published in Heylon, consider this work as the main starting point. It is a guideline for investigating the consequences of anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer.

 

 

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